doctor-patient communication

The Most Powerful Tool in Medicine

Danielle Ofri speaks at the Mayo Clinic about conversation as the single most powerful tool in medicine. More

Facebook Live

Our first Facebook Live event! We discussed doctor-patient communication, medical humanities, the Bellevue Literary Review, patient support groups. And we had a book giveaway. Hope you can join us for the next one on Monday Dec 11 at 2:15 pm.   More

The Conversation Placebo

Pain remedies developed by the pharmaceutical industry are only modestly effective, and they have side effects that range from nausea and constipation to addiction and death. What’s often overlooked is that the simple conversation between doctor and patient can be as potent an analgesic as many treatments we prescribe. More

Podcast: Listen to the Patient!

Danielle is interviewed by Joe Elia from the New England Journal of Medicine about her new book, “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear.” More

Just a “Regular” Doctor

“What’s your specialty?” This question continually flummoxes me. This is the moment that I experience a brief surge of envy toward my cardiology and dermatology colleagues who have simple one-word answers to this question that any lay person can understand. More

The Doctor-Patient Relationship is Alive and Well

Medicine is unquestionably harder than it was 10 years ago. Many more doctors I know talk about quitting (an option that is not equally available to patients). However, there’s been no mass exodus of doctors. We doctors grumble loudly — often with good cause — but we aren’t quitting in droves, mainly because of patients like Ms. M. More

Should Doctors Care About Happiness?

We in the health care professions need to notice and inquire about happiness the same way we do other aspects of our patients’ lives. More

Patients, and Doctors, Aren’t Dying at Home

Doctors, it turns out, aren’t much different than everyone else when it comes to where they die. More

Getting the Diagnosis Wrong

Diagnostic accuracy is fiendishly difficult to measure precisely. A new report suggests that nearly everyone will experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetimes. More

Getting the Diagnosis Right

If I had the luxury of an hour with each patient, I would have the time to carefully sort through every diagnostic possibility. But the reality is that I, like most doctors, have five to 10 minutes to push the majority of diagnoses to the bottom of the list, come up with the most likely few at the top. More

My Patient Doesn’t “Do” Vaccines

When my patient told me that he doesn’t “do” vaccines, I decided to try to understand his reasons, More

Giving the Doctor a Second Chance

“Someone had said you were a good doctor,” my patient said derisively, “but I was not impressed.” What had I done? More

The Physical Exam as Refuge

There are few situations where we expect to disrobe and have our bodies touched by relative strangers. More

History & Physical podcast series

Danielle Ofri discusses preserving empathy as a medical student, how she started writing, the role of narrative medicine, and the consequences of algorithmic medicine. More

Incidental Illness

How, in the quiet world of outpatient medicine, does one know when a life is saved? More

Books by Danielle Ofri

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