Posts

Covid: Primary Sources

The Covid Pandemic at Two Years: A conversation about creativity in the face of a global pandemic, from both artists and healthcare workers who experienced it firsthand. More

“What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” in Japanese

こんにちは Kon’nichiwa! Beacon Press is excited to announce that “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” is now available in Japanese! Get your platter of sushi ready and order your copy here. “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” is also available in Chinese and in Italian. (Spanish edition coming soon!) More

“What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” in Chinese

你好 Nǐ hǎo Beacon Press is excited to announce that “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” is now available in Chinese! Steam those dumplings and order your copy here. “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear” is also available in Italian. (Spanish edition coming soon!) More

“What Doctors Feel” in Chinese

你好 Nǐ hǎo Beacon Press is excited to announce that “What Doctors Feel” is now available in Chinese! Steam those dumplings and order your copy here. “What Doctors Feel” is also available in Korean and in Japanese. (Spanish edition coming soon!) Parli Italiano? Get your espresso and check out the Italian version of “What Patients … More

Imagining Vesalius

While we typically envision the brain as a palpable whole, the spidery latticework of nerves is a more ephemeral affair. At best the nerves come across as limp linguini, flopping languidly over whatever bone, muscle or organ offers a convenient landing pad. Seeing the nervous system entirely disembodied is revelatory. More

NPR’s ShortWave podcast

Emily Kwong interviews NPR Arts Reporter Neda Ulaby about her story on Danielle Ofri and BLR’s 20th Anniversary for the ShortWave Podcast. More

BLR Turns 20!

For 20 years, Bellevue Literary Review has been at the forefront of publishing at intersection of healthcare and the arts. For 20 years, Bellevue Literary Review has been at the forefront of publishing at intersection of healthcare and the arts. BLR publishes fiction, poetry, & nonfiction about health, illness, and healing. Watch the historic celebration. Co-hosted by BLR editor-in-chief Danielle Ofri and actor Kelly AuCoin More

Covid Writing Goes Viral

Covid Writing Goes Viral: How Literary & Social Media Writing Became a Lifeline during the Pandemic More

Book Launch: “When We Do Harm”

Although Covid19 kept us from meeting up amidst the Strand’s 18 incredible miles of books, Strand Bookstore graciously opened its virtual doors for our book launch. You can see it here. More

“What Doctors Feel” in Korean

안녕하세요 “What Doctors Feel” is now available in Korean! The perfect complement to your bibimbap-and-kimchi lunch. More

Medicine and the Machine podcast

A free-wheeling conversation with Eric Topol, Abraham Verghese and Danielle Ofri on everything from artificial intelligence to literary magazines to “falling in love” with your patients. Listen to the inaugural episode of Medscape’s new “Medicine and the Machine” podcast. More

Gaudeamus Igitur by John Stone

“Gaudeamus Igitur” is one of my favorite poems of all times. John Stone was a poet and cardiologist at Emory University, He wrote this poem (the title means “Therefore, Let us Rejoice” for a graduating class at Emory Medical School. More

A Tense Moment in the ER

The hospital, by definition, is a stressful place for patients and families unsettled by the vulnerabilities of the human body. Add in issues of race, class, gender, power dynamics, economics, and long wait times, and you have the ingredients for combustion just hankering for tinder. More

A True Role Model: Dr. Lisa Schwartz

Lisa was my very first resident. She taught us medical students how to aspirate ascites fluid from the abdomen of a cirrhotic patient, how to diagnose granulomatosis with polyangiitis, how to wrangle a CT scan from an obdurate radiologist, how to handle a hallucinating patient who spoke only Igbo, and where to get a cheese Danish once the coffee shop closed. More

Prescribing Democracy

“There cannot be any doubt,” Dr. Rudolf Virchow wrote in 1848, that the recent typhus epidemic was a result of “poverty and underdevelopment.” His prescription was “free and unlimited democracy.” Hmm–a prescription for democracy. Not something you get at your average doctor’s visit. But maybe that’s what we need. More

Books by Danielle Ofri

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