medical training

NPR Interview–Why Would Anyone Become a Doctor?

Danielle Ofri speaks on Minnesota Public Radio about why  would anyone choose to become a doctor. Hear the story now. More

Why Would Anyone Become a Doctor?

The awe of discovering the human body. The honor of being trusted to give advice. The gratitude for helping someone through a difficult illness. These things never grow old. More

Owning Up to Medical Error

Precisely two weeks after completing my medical internship,I proceeded to nearly kill a patient. July marked the startof my second year of residency at New York City’s BellevueHospital, and it was my first time being fully in charge of a patient. More

Residency Regulators are Back!

Every patient wants a doctor who is well rested and alert, but limiting residents to 80 hours per week wasn’t as simple a panacea as it seemed. In fact, the 80-hour workweek did not decrease errors and did not increase sleep time for the doctors. More

“July 1st” : Part Three

Watch the final installment of Danielle reading “July 1st,” the poignant and funny story about the first day of internship. One of the most popular requests of her readings. (From “Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue.” More

“July 1st” : Part Two

Watch Part Two of Danielle reading “July 1st,” the poignant and funny story about the first day of internship. One of the most popular requests of her readings. (From “Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue.” More

“July 1st”: Part One

Watch the video of Danielle reading “July 1st,” the poignant and funny story about the first day of internship. One of the most popular requests of her readings. (From “Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue.” More

Residency Regulations—Resisting Our Reflexes

Our instinctive resistance to change reflects not just nostalgia, but the fact that our years of medical training define us in an iconic fashion unique to this profession. Medical training sets social, clinical, and moral barometers by which decades of professional and personal life are gauged. These brief years imprint a personal definition in a manner not seen in other fields: one rarely hears MBAs clucking about crumbling standards and the days of the giants—most view the younger generation with unabashed envy. More

Autopsy Room

Our first stop was the morgue. The cavernous walk-in refrigerator was icy and silent. Here were the unclaimed bodies, mostly elderly men from the streets. The ones that were never identified, never claimed, went to our anatomy lab. More

Books by Danielle Ofri

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